Posts tagged "pipa"
quickhits:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

CISPA Passed in the House Today!!! It Was Railroaded Through the House Without Any Warning Today!!!
The House passed the controversial CISPA cybersecurity bill on Thursday, defying a White House veto threat and throwing the issue squarely into the Senate’s lap.
House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) said the bill was “needed to prepare for countries like Iran and North Korea so that they don’t do something catastrophic to our networks here in America.”
The final tally was 248-168, enough to pass the bill but not enough to override the threatened veto. Forty-two Democrats voted for the measure, and 28 Republicans voted against it.
The administration and Democratic critics opposed the bill because of privacy and civil liberties concerns. The other main sticking point was that, unlike a Senate bill by Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.), CISPA would not mandate new security requirements for a critical infrastructure network.
But the measure enjoyed support from some Democrats — who weren’t happy with their colleagues’ opposition to the bill, nor with the White House.
“It was disappointing, I think it could have been handled differently,” Rep. Jim Langevin, (D-R.I.), a CISPA co-sponsor, said of the White House move. “To do it at this stage I don’t think it was very helpful to get an information-sharing bill through.”
Langevin and other supportive Democrats say CISPA is needed to counter the possibility of a major cyberattack.
“This is not a perfect bill, but the threat is great,” Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.), Rogers’s chief Democratic ally, said on the House floor on Thursday.
Speaker John Boehner said Thursday that the White House was in “a camp all by themselves.” Nevertheless, most Democrats voted against the bill.
“CISPA would trample the privacy and consumer rights of our citizens while leaving our critical infrastructure vulnerable,” an administration official said Thursday in response to Boehner. “We need Congress to address this critical national and economic security challenge while respecting the values of freedom, privacy, openness and innovation so fundamental to our nation.”
The House adopted several amendments to the bill before passing it, including one by Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R-S.C.) that added a five-year sunset to the bill.
But lawmakers voted to reject a motion to recommit by Rep. Ed Perlmuttter, who sought to add language specifying that nothing in the bill could be construed to allow employers and the government from mandating that employees and job applicants disclose confidential passwords without a court order. The defeated motion also would have added language saying that nothing in the bill could allow the government from blocking access to the Web through “the creation of a national Internet firewall similar to the ‘Great Internet Firewall of China.’”
The tech sector immediately applauded the House action on Thursday.
“We strongly urge the Senate to swiftly take up this issue because the United States cannot afford to wait to improve our nation’s cybersecurity posture,” TechAmerica CEO Shawn Osborne said in a statement. “Standing pat will only further risk our national security.”
But civil liberterians were unhappy with the outcome.
“Cybersecurity does not have to mean abdication of Americans’ online privacy. As we’ve seen repeatedly, once the government gets expansive national security authorities, there’s no going back,” ACLU legislative counsel Michelle Richardson said. “We encourage the Senate to let this horrible bill fade into obscurity.”
We pushed them to the brink, but House Republicans rammed through CISPA this afternoon, ahead of schedule.  
Let’s make sure it dies in the Senate: Please click here to email your Senators right away.
Our hundreds of thousands of emails and tens of thousands of phone calls have had a real impact:
Amendments were adopted that made CISPA (marginally) better.
Earlier this month CISPA was supposed to sail through, but we helped foment real opposition, and the vote was far closer than anybody could have imagined even a couple of weeks ago.
Most Democrats held firm in opposition, and more than two dozen libertarian-leaning Republicans defied their leadership and vote no.
Most importantly, President Obama has threatened to veto CISPA.
The Senate will consider cyber security legislation in the coming weeks.  Let’s turn up the heat right away:
Click here to tell the Senate to reject CISPA and any and all legislation that doesn’t respect privacy and civil liberties.
Thanks for fighting by our side, and please encourage your friends to get involved.  You can forward this email or use these links:
 If you’re already on Facebook, click here to share with your friends.  If you’re already on Twitter, click here to tweet about the campaign: Tweet

I bolded the good news part.

quickhits:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

CISPA Passed in the House Today!!! It Was Railroaded Through the House Without Any Warning Today!!!

The House passed the controversial CISPA cybersecurity bill on Thursday, defying a White House veto threat and throwing the issue squarely into the Senate’s lap.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) said the bill was “needed to prepare for countries like Iran and North Korea so that they don’t do something catastrophic to our networks here in America.”

The final tally was 248-168, enough to pass the bill but not enough to override the threatened veto. Forty-two Democrats voted for the measure, and 28 Republicans voted against it.

The administration and Democratic critics opposed the bill because of privacy and civil liberties concerns. The other main sticking point was that, unlike a Senate bill by Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.), CISPA would not mandate new security requirements for a critical infrastructure network.

But the measure enjoyed support from some Democrats — who weren’t happy with their colleagues’ opposition to the bill, nor with the White House.

“It was disappointing, I think it could have been handled differently,” Rep. Jim Langevin, (D-R.I.), a CISPA co-sponsor, said of the White House move. “To do it at this stage I don’t think it was very helpful to get an information-sharing bill through.”

Langevin and other supportive Democrats say CISPA is needed to counter the possibility of a major cyberattack.

“This is not a perfect bill, but the threat is great,” Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.), Rogers’s chief Democratic ally, said on the House floor on Thursday.

Speaker John Boehner said Thursday that the White House was in “a camp all by themselves.” Nevertheless, most Democrats voted against the bill.

“CISPA would trample the privacy and consumer rights of our citizens while leaving our critical infrastructure vulnerable,” an administration official said Thursday in response to Boehner. “We need Congress to address this critical national and economic security challenge while respecting the values of freedom, privacy, openness and innovation so fundamental to our nation.”

The House adopted several amendments to the bill before passing it, including one by Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R-S.C.) that added a five-year sunset to the bill.

But lawmakers voted to reject a motion to recommit by Rep. Ed Perlmuttter, who sought to add language specifying that nothing in the bill could be construed to allow employers and the government from mandating that employees and job applicants disclose confidential passwords without a court order. The defeated motion also would have added language saying that nothing in the bill could allow the government from blocking access to the Web through “the creation of a national Internet firewall similar to the ‘Great Internet Firewall of China.’”

The tech sector immediately applauded the House action on Thursday.

“We strongly urge the Senate to swiftly take up this issue because the United States cannot afford to wait to improve our nation’s cybersecurity posture,” TechAmerica CEO Shawn Osborne said in a statement. “Standing pat will only further risk our national security.”

But civil liberterians were unhappy with the outcome.

“Cybersecurity does not have to mean abdication of Americans’ online privacy. As we’ve seen repeatedly, once the government gets expansive national security authorities, there’s no going back,” ACLU legislative counsel Michelle Richardson said. “We encourage the Senate to let this horrible bill fade into obscurity.”

We pushed them to the brink, but House Republicans rammed through CISPA this afternoon, ahead of schedule.  

Let’s make sure it dies in the Senate: Please click here to email your Senators right away.

Our hundreds of thousands of emails and tens of thousands of phone calls have had a real impact:

  • Amendments were adopted that made CISPA (marginally) better.
  • Earlier this month CISPA was supposed to sail through, but we helped foment real opposition, and the vote was far closer than anybody could have imagined even a couple of weeks ago.
  • Most Democrats held firm in opposition, and more than two dozen libertarian-leaning Republicans defied their leadership and vote no.
  • Most importantly, President Obama has threatened to veto CISPA.

The Senate will consider cyber security legislation in the coming weeks.  Let’s turn up the heat right away:

Click here to tell the Senate to reject CISPA and any and all legislation that doesn’t respect privacy and civil liberties.

Thanks for fighting by our side, and please encourage your friends to get involved.  You can forward this email or use these links:

[fb] If you’re already on Facebookclick here to share with your friends. [fb] If you’re already on Twitter, click here to tweet about the campaign: Tweet

I bolded the good news part.

mohandasgandhi:

reuters:

A change in policy: Twitter announced Thursday that it would begin restricting Tweets in certain countries, marking a policy shift for the social media platform that helped propel the popular uprisings recently sweeping across the Middle East.
 
“Starting today, we give ourselves the ability  to reactively withhold content from users in a specific country while  keeping it available in the rest of the world,” the Twitter blog said.
Read more: Twitter to restrict user content in some countries

Not cool.

Uh, can’t they already “restrict the content of certain users” by suspending or deactivating an account when legitimate TOS violations occur?

mohandasgandhi:

reuters:

A change in policy: Twitter announced Thursday that it would begin restricting Tweets in certain countries, marking a policy shift for the social media platform that helped propel the popular uprisings recently sweeping across the Middle East.

“Starting today, we give ourselves the ability to reactively withhold content from users in a specific country while keeping it available in the rest of the world,” the Twitter blog said.

Read more: Twitter to restrict user content in some countries

Not cool.

Uh, can’t they already “restrict the content of certain users” by suspending or deactivating an account when legitimate TOS violations occur?

(via pantslessprogressive)

…making money from art is not a human right. It so happens that technological and societal blahbity bloos have conspired to create a situation where selling songs about monkeys and robots is a viable business, but for most of human history people have NOT paid for art. I don’t want this to happen again, and I would be very sad if this came to pass, but it’s not up to me to decide. We are constantly demonstrating through our actions what we believe to be the norms for acquiring and consuming content. Right now a lot of us think that it’s OK to download stuff through illegal sites under certain circumstances, and a lot of us think it’s totally fine to use those things to make videos and put them on YouTube even though YouTube profits from it. That’s not ME saying that, that’s US saying that – we’re a nation of pirates and infringers. Based on our behavior, you would not be wrong to deduce that some of us think funny videos on YouTube are more important than honoring intellectual property rights. This kind of thing has happened before. Entire industries rise and fall as the world changes and our priorities shift. Sorry. I believe in copyright. I benefit from it. I don’t want it to go away. I love that we have laws and people to enforce them. But if I had to give up one thing, if I had to choose between copyright and the wild west, semi-lawless, innovation-fest that is the internet? I’ll take the internet every time.
Jonathan Coulton (via azspot)

(via silas216)

NSFW - no joke. Rude & unapologetic.

#INFP - so true. Who knew? #NoH8 #ProChoice #fem2 #ChildAbuse #AnimalAbuse

Contrarian by nature; Democrat by choice. #p2 #p21 #CTL #Obama2012

Together we MUST take back the power wrongfully seized by banks, corporations, and the corrupt politicians they fund. #OWS #99

#Justice4Trayvon is the other tumblr I branched from this one so I could track the developments in the #Trayvon Martin case.

twitter.com/TheRiverWanders

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